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A darker shade of racing greenBack

The superstition that green cars are unlucky has plagued car dealers for years. Many people feel this way and all you have to do is enter “are green cars unlucky?” into a search engine and you can expect to be barraged by blogs and forum comments suggesting that green cars are more prone to breaking down and crashes.

The roots of this superstition are said to sprout from the many deaths associated with race car driving. Racing green, which is said to be shades of Brunswick green, moss green, hunter green and forest green was adopted as the British national racing colour and was known as British racing green or BRG. This colour has been associated with a lot of the crashes and resulting deaths in the early stages of race car driving. The French are said to have the same disposition with the colour blue.

It is said that in America green cars are said to be unlucky due to the death of defending Indianapolis 500 champion Gaston Chevrolet, one of the three founding brothers of his namesake’s car company. The crash that killed Chevrolet in 1920 also killed two other race car drivers, Eddie O’Donnell and Joe Thomas, this being the first time three American race car drivers had died in one accident, and Chevrolet was driving a green Frontenac, thus spreading the idea of green being an unlucky colour for cars all over the world.

Is the colour of a car a pre-determinate for a poor car or is it just a case of bad luck that has tarred the colour with a negative brushstroke? All that can be said is that the history of the colour speaks for itself, but this will not be the case for every green car ever produced

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Posted by Leana Kell on 21/06/2012