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Is the worst car passenger your partner?Back

DrivingWithYourOtherHalfDo you feel on edge when driving with your partner? According to a new survey, many motorists consider their other half the worst car passenger.

If you’re considering a road trip this half-term, maybe you would be wise to leave your partner at home? New research released by Allianz Insurance suggests that motorists are four times more anxious when their other half is beside them.

For many of us, this news comes as no surprise, but now research proves that driving with your partner can send your stress levels soaring! The survey sites that ‘partner pressure’ almost quadruples a driver’s likelihood of feeling stressed or anxious behind the wheel.

Allianz Insurance concluded that: ‘Having their ‘significant other’ in the car alongside them makes drivers feel twice as rushed which reduces the chance of them feeling calm and relaxed by nearly 65 per cent (and) increases the risk of having an accident’.

A poll carried out by Omnibus of 1000 motorists who drive regularly, concluded that stress levels were rife when one’s husband, wife, boyfriend, girlfriend or ‘partner’ were alongside them, with results showing that men appear to wind up their female partners more. When driving with their partners in the car, less than one third (32%) of women felt calm and relaxed in comparison to 43% of men.

Children were cited as the second most difficult passengers to have in the car when driving, with only a quarter of women feeling calm and relaxed when driving with their children, as opposed to one third of men. Other’s people’s children, your own children, parents and family members were also found to be in the top five in-car stress inducers.

Further findings from the survey revealed that nearly one in five motorists (18%) found city centres to be the road locations where drivers feel most stressed, followed by town areas at 8 per cent, motorways at 8 per cent and dual carriageways at 5 per cent. Drivers also admitted to feeling the most rushed when commuting to and from work, driving to appointment such as the doctors or driving to school.

Jon Dye, CEO of Allianz Insurance said: ‘The tales of back seat drivers and in-car arguments we’re all so familiar with, cause stress and distraction when drivers should be feeling calm and focused. ‘It’s important that motorists and their partners are aware of the risks a stressful environment in a vehicle can create.’

 

Posted by Leana Kell on 27/05/2014