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AA set to launch sat-nav tracked insurance policyBack

The AA is set to launch a new insurance policy which is based on a system that highlights better drivers using sat-nav technology.

The sat-nav is designed to track a driver’s performance and then rate their insurance based on its findings and is a follow on from the work of smaller insurers who have previously tapped into the same idea.

The AA said that the system will allows its better drivers to achieve cheaper premiums and could therefore represent a more accurate and fair way to determine someone’s insurance policy.

The system involves installing a black box into the driver’s car which will monitor how they drive, measuring a driver’s speed, braking severity, cornering and the types of road which they use at certain times of the day.

The information is transmitted remotely to the insurers and can also be accessed via a website which drivers can view to provide them with an indication of their overall performance. The website will also be set to warn motorists if they are likely to be moved to a higher insurance premium.

“The reports are pretty detailed,” AA spokesman Ian Crowder told the BBC ahead of Wednesday’s formal announcement.

“The point is that these sorts of devices firmly put in the hands of the driver a responsibility for driving safely. It makes you think.”

A further advantage of the system which My Crowder pointed out, was that the information recorded in the black box could also be used to prove who was at fault during an accident, although this type of information would only be disclosed with a court order.

The system, referred to by Mr Crowder as “pay-how-you-drive”, is aimed mainly at younger drivers, and is designed to save customers as much as £850 per year on their insurance premiums.

Malcolm Tarling, from the Association of British Insurers, said: “It’s particularly important for young drivers who have high premiums.”

“You may say you don’t want a ‘spy in the car’ as some call them, but others may say that if this is one way of making my premiums reflect my safety on the road, this will be of interest.”

 

 

Posted by Leana Kell on 13/02/2012