Maximum number of cars added to compare list.

What's your postcode?

We need your postcode in order to provide accurate search results.

Enquire

Enter your first name
Enter your last name
Enter your phone number

Got a part exchange?

Tell us your reg plate and receive a part exchange valuation on your car?

What's this?

Compare cars side by side to save time clicking backwards and forwards between them.

Mid Week HeadlinesBack

BBC.co.uk

Single market boosts UK car industry, says SMMT car manufacturing

Access to the single market has been a key factor behind the success of the UK car industry, its trade body has said, as it reported record turnover in 2015. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) said turnover rose 7.3% to £71.6bn, while employment and vehicle production also grew sharply. The number employed in the sector rose by 17,000 to 814,000.

The UK’s future access to the single market has been brought into question following the vote to leave the EU.

 

 

The Financial Times

 

Volkswagen diesel emissions scandal far from over

The latest chapter in the Volkswagen diesel emissions scandal ends with a cliffhanger. Europe’s largest carmaker on Tuesday agreed with US authorities to pay up to $10.03bn to buy back or fix almost half a million cars equipped with software to cheat during official emissions tests. VW has also agreed to pay a $2.7bn fine to environmental authorities for excess pollution, invest $2bn in green vehicle technology and offer $603m to 44 US states and two other territories to resolve legal claims. But the settlement reached in the US — where regulators uncovered the VW scandal last September — is not the end of the story, warn analysts. “This is a major win and a step in the right direction, but the fat lady is not warming her vocals,” says Mike Tyndall at Citi.

 

After a resounding Brexit vote, Sunderland fears for Nissan plant

The British car industry issued a clear warning: leaving the EU could put jobs at risk. But just a few days later Sunderland, the home of Nissan, delivered its verdict: a resounding 61.3 per cent of people voted for Brexit regardless. Nissan has declined to comment on what Brexit means for the plant, a £3.85bn investment where 6,700 people work. But rumours are sweeping the production line.

 

 

The Times

 

Don’t rush into cutting jobs, urges Javid

Sajid Javid pledged to bolster Britain’s team of trade negotiators yesterday as the business secretary urged employers not to cut jobs because of the vote to leave the European Union. Mr Javid said that the process of drafting in more officials had already begun and he argued that the country could “take advantage” of Brexit once they had been recruited. At hastily arranged talks with some of the country’s largest businesses, Mr Javid told senior executives that now was “not the time for hasty decisions that will be regretted later”.

 

 

The Daily Telegraph

 

Small businesses face funding gap after Brexit vote

Small companies are delaying investment decisions and losing some funding opportunities in the uncertainty triggered by UK’s vote to leave the European Union, according to business lenders.  Further progress on Funding Circle’s £100m deal with the European Investment Bank, which was unveiled last week, is now almost certainly off the table, admitted James Meekings, who co-founded the peer-to-peer lender. “That was a start to create a multi-billion pound programme for getting more funds into UK business. The programme is at risk. If I’m honest, it’s very unlikely to happen now. Who knows? From our situation we obviously want it to happen,” he told the Business Select Committee.

 

 

The Guardian

 

UK ministers to approve world-leading carbon emissions target emissions zero image

Ministers will this week approve a world-leading carbon emissions reduction target for the early 2030s, the Guardian understands.

Fears had been raised by green groups and industry that the EU referendum would cause the UK government to miss a deadline on Thursdayfor accepting carbon targets from its statutory climate advisers. But a Whitehall source has confirmed that the so-called fifth carbon budget – put forward by the Committee on Climate Change last November – will be agreed before the month is out, as legally required by the Climate Change Act. The move commits the UK to a 57% cut in emissions by 2032, on 1990 levels. Although a tougher target than the EU one of a 40% emissions cut by 2030, environmentalists in January said they were disappointed that the committee had not made the target more ambitious after last December’s Paris climate deal.

 

 

The Daily Mirror

 

Electric cars could rule the road in just over 10 years say motor industry experts

Sales of the vehicles are surging so fast the market looks set to meet government forecasts for the end of new diesel and petrol cars by 2040Electric cars could out sell diesel and petrol models by 2027, according to industry experts. Surging sales of electric vehicles suggest the market is on course to meet government forecasts for all new cars and vans to be electric by 2040.And current trends put electric vehicles on the road to accounting for more than half of all new registrations – around 1.3m a year – by 2027.

The figures are revealed in a new automotive industry forecast by Go Ultra Low, the government and industry-backed campaign. The electric car revolution began in 2011 with the launch of the plug-in car grant with just over 1,000 annual registrations.

 

 

The Daily Mail – Quote from Brian Madderson, PRA Chairman

 

What will really happen to house prices, fuel bills and taxes? We debunk the Brexit myths so you can plan YOUR family finances

Savers, borrowers and shoppers have been targeted for months with scare stories designed to stop them voting to leave the EU. But all the doom-mongering fell on deaf ears. Petrol could get more expensive in the coming weeks, experts say. This is because fuel is priced and sold in US dollars. And since the Brexit vote, the pound has fallen in value against the dollar. That means it takes more pounds to buy the same amount of fuel. But there’s no need to panic.  Brian Madderson, chairman of the Petrol Retailers Association, predicts at most a 2p to 3p a litre rise at the pumps. That would add around £1.25 to the cost of filling up the typical tank of a family car.

 

 

 

 

The Daily Mirror

 

Electric cars could rule the road in just over 10 years say motor industry experts electric car charging

Sales of the vehicles are surging so fast the market looks set to meet government forecasts for the end of new diesel and petrol cars by 2040Electric cars could out sell diesel and petrol models by 2027, according to industry experts. Surging sales of electric vehicles suggest the market is on course to meet government forecasts for all new cars and vans to be electric by 2040.And current trends put electric vehicles on the road to accounting for more than half of all new registrations – around 1.3m a year – by 2027.

The figures are revealed in a new automotive industry forecast by Go Ultra Low, the government and industry-backed campaign. The electric car revolution began in 2011 with the launch of the plug-in car grant with just over 1,000 annual registrations.

 

 

The Daily Mail – Quote from Brian Madderson, PRA Chairman

 

What will really happen to house prices, fuel bills and taxes? We debunk the Brexit myths so you can plan YOUR family finances

Savers, borrowers and shoppers have been targeted for months with scare stories designed to stop them voting to leave the EU. But all the doom-mongering fell on deaf ears. Petrol could get more expensive in the coming weeks, experts say. This is because fuel is priced and sold in US dollars. And since the Brexit vote, the pound has fallen in value against the dollar. That means it takes more pounds to buy the same amount of fuel. But there’s no need to panic.  Brian Madderson, chairman of the Petrol Retailers Association, predicts at most a 2p to 3p a litre rise at the pumps. That would add around £1.25 to the cost of filling up the typical tank of a family car.

 

 

Posted by Paul Carpenter on 29/06/2016