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New car price ‘haggle room’ grows, says What Car?Back

The amount of money consumers are being told they can expect to get knocked off the price of a new car has increased 5% year-on-year.

Each month consumer magazine What Car? produces what it calls its ‘target price’ analysis based on the deals it says buyers can make in the showroom.

MoneyCar makers such as BMW, Mercedes, Volvo and Volkswagen have all had sales bonuses in excess of £5,000 per car available on selected models, while customers choosing various Vauxhall and Skoda variants have been able to buy using a five-year interest free hire purchase deal and a 42-month, 0% APR PCP respectively, What Car? says.

“There has been a 5% year-on-year increase in the all-sector average target price saving per car, up from £2,189 to £2,297.

“From the customer’s perspective, certain car sectors have performed better than others. The average target price discount on executive cars is now 2.3% higher than 12 months ago, while coupé models and estate cars are up 2% and 1% respectively,” a What Car? spokesman said.

The average increase in typical showroom savings has been a more modest 0.6% across the city car, SUV, roadsters and cabriolet sectors, where manufacturers have created, and sustained, high demand for sought after models such as the Volkswagen Up, Audi Q3 and Mini Cooper Convertible.

“If the current consumer confidence grows this year, we expect to see car makers becoming more selective with their incentive targeting. This could make it more difficult for car buyers to secure significant discounts on the more popular models.”

Source: am-online.com

Posted by Leana Kell on 02/02/2014